NCAA and Iowa: You Will Blog When We Tell You to Blog

 

Well, well, well. It seems as if the University of Iowa and the NCAA want to stifle communication coming out of … press boxes?

Before Iowa football coach Kirk Ferentz’s press conference Tuesday, a notice was handed out to media members detailing the NCAA’s absurd blogging policy from its sporting events.

Here is that policy:

Each Credential Holder (including television, Internet, new media, and print publications) has the privilege to blog (e.g., real-time or time delayed journal entries) during competition through the credential entity. All blogs must be free of charge to readers. All must adhere to the conditions and limitations of this NCAA Blogging Policy. A blog description includes in-competition updates on score and time remaining and a description of the competition taking place during the given time. The NCAA and host institution shall be the final authority on whether a credential holder or credential entity is followingn the NCAA Blogging Policy.

The following is the NCAA’s policy for the number of blogs allowed during a competition or session (i.e., where more than one contest takes place under the same admission ticket). They are applicable to both genders.

Basketball/Football: Five times per half; one at halftime, two times per overtime period.

 

OK, what’s causin’ all this commotion? I dunno, but maybe Gazetteonline.com’s liveblogging sessions hosted by Scott Dochterman and myself from the Maine-Iowa game may have irked someone, somewhere. Why? Who knows? Dochterman was doing a lot of play-by-play, so maybe they didn’t like that. Maybe they didn’t like me allowing outsiders to come in and make occasionally catty remarks? Maybe the Big Ten Network or Learfield or some suit at Iowa just didn’t like what they saw.

Maybe some other newspaper’s Web site rankled someone.

Maybe I’m completely paranoid. I never rule out that possibility.

Liveblogging, with a give-and-take between the host at the game and those who come in to offer their own observations … I’m not sure where that fits in. It seems bizarre, since you can do the very same thing about the game from any other place you want.

I’m going to do another liveblogging session at the Florida International-Iowa game, and I’ll play by the rules of the the mighty, mighty NCAA. At least I think I’ll be playing by its rules. Look for the link to the liveblog at the Gazetteonline.com sports page on Saturday morning. I’ll begin around 10:45 a.m.

Hopefully, I’ll stay within the lines of the NCAA’s rules. Because I’d sure hate to go on probation. Or worse. Guantanamo Bay is a miserable place to spend an autumn, I hear.

For some background on how this all flared up over a year ago somewhere else:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/14/sports/baseball/14blogs.html

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11 responses to “NCAA and Iowa: You Will Blog When We Tell You to Blog

  1. Oh, c’mon. And what are they going to do about the Blackberry-toting tech geek in the skybox or the spoiled college student with an iPhone in the student section, should they start liveblogging? I know, this is about control, and press credentials are the leverage the NCAA can use to threaten the media. So what’s to stop us from recruiting that geek or that student to liveblog for us? The beauty of the Internet is that it takes control away from the usual suspects and gives it to the crowd. We cannot control the flow of info — not the media, not the NCAA. Clay Shirky’s “Here Comes Everybody” should be required reading at the UI.

  2. oh boy, everyone’s all a twitter again … i think bosworth was ahead of the curve with his ncaa/communists t-shirt … my gosh, let people talk! this whole conversation’s on par with otter’s spiel to neidermayer in the delta house hearing … and i quote – ”Greg – isn’t this an indictment of our entire American society? Well, you can do whatever you want to us, but we’re not going to sit here and listen to you badmouth the United States of America. Gentlemen!”

  3. Amen Annette and Bobby!

  4. We never would have had this problem in the old days…

  5. In the old days, George Wine would have filled one of Evy’s tube socks with bars of lye soap, dragged that Dochterman scamp out behind Iowa Stadium, and beaten the tarnation out of him. We didn’t need any “NCAA policy” to keep law and order in the press box.

    Keep fighting the good fight.

  6. The NCAA’s policy is only applicable to championship events. So Iowa is in violation by enforcing it now.

  7. Bloggers and newspaper Web sites should just create links to social networks or other blogs inviting all fans with smart phones at the games to post all the comments they want! Play by play or otherwise. What will the NCAA do? Eject the entire flipping crowd? Give me a break.

  8. Pingback: The Meck Deck » Blog Archive » Notes and Rumors for a Sunday

  9. I sure hope the NCAA doesn’t cotton to the hundreds of Message Boards that follow games play by play from people watching in their living rooms…I’ve been able to follow games from them without ever needing to turn on the TV to watch the game!

    The NCAA is all about control. IF they think they can control every aspect of teh intertubes…they got another thing coming…

  10. Pingback: NCAA’s policy remains idiotic « ON SPORTS

  11. I here the newcomer. Not absolutely I will understand with topic. Explain, please. http://kopitop.ru/map.html

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